USD 50 Million Ransom Demanded from Saudi Aramco Over Leaked Data

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Michael Peter

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Saudi Arabia’s state oil firm admitted on Wednesday that data from the corporation was leaked and that the files are now being used in a cyber-extortion effort including a USD 50 million ransom demand. The data was presumably leaked by one of the company’s contractors. Saudi Aramco, the Saudi Arabian Oil Co., notified The Associated Press that it “recently became aware of the indirect release of a limited amount of company data which was held by third-party contractors.”
Saudi Aramco is a public Saudi Arabian oil and gas enterprise headquartered in Dhahran. It is expected to be one of the world’s most profitable corporations as of 2020. Saudi Aramco has the world’s second-biggest proven crude oil reserves, with about 270 billion barrels (43 billion cubic metres), as well as the world’s greatest daily oil production. 
The Master Gas System, operated by Saudi Aramco, is the world’s biggest single hydrocarbon network. It handles about one hundred oil and gas fields in Saudi Arabia, including 288.4 trillion standard cubic feet (scf) of natural gas reserves, and its crude oil production totaled 3.4 billion barrels (540 million cubic metres) in 2013. The Ghawar Field, the world’s largest onshore oil field, and the Safaniya Field, the world’s largest offshore oil field, are both operated by Saudi Aramco. 
The oil company did not specify which contractor was affected, nor did it clarify whether the contractor was hacked or if the information was released in some other way. “We confirm that the release of data was not due to a breach of our systems, has no impact on our operations and the company continues to maintain a robust cybersecurity posture,” Aramco said. 
The AP found a page on the darknet, a section of the internet kept behind an encrypted network and accessible only through specific anonymity-providing tools, that claimed the extortionist had 1 terabyte of Aramco data. The page offered Aramco the chance to have the data destroyed for USD 50 million in cryptocurrency, with a countdown counting down from USD 5 million, most likely to put pressure on the corporation. It’s still unknown who’s behind the ransom plot. 
Aramco has previously been the victim of cyber-attacks. The so-called Shamoon computer virus, which destroyed hard drives and then flashed a picture of a burning American flag on computer displays, affected the oil behemoth in 2012. Aramco was compelled to shut down its network and destroy over 30,000 machines as a result of the attack. Later, US officials blamed the strike on Iran, whose nuclear enrichment programme had just been targeted by the Stuxnet virus, which was most likely created by the US and Israel.

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